Big Picture Science – Brain Dust: Michel Maharbiz / Neural Dust

December 5, 2016

If you’re new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! BiPiSci – Neural Dustclick to listen (trt 16:42) Part 3 of Brain Dust, featuring Michel Maharbiz, electrical engineer at the University of California, Berkeley, describing tiny particles being designed to interface with the human brain.

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Big Picture Science – What Lies Beneath

November 28, 2016

Big Picture Science – What Lies Beneath What you can’t see may astound you. The largest unexplored region of Earth is the ocean. Beneath its churning surface, oceanographers have recently discovered the largest volcano in the world – perhaps in the solar system. Find out what is known – and yet to be discovered – […]

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Big Picture Science – What Lies Beneath: Chris Goldfinger / Cascadia Subduction Zone

November 28, 2016

What Lies Beneath / Cascadia Subduction Zone click to listen (TRT 11:35) Part 3 of What Lies Beneath, featuring Chris Goldfinger, marine geologist, geophysicist and paleo-seismologist at Oregon State University, explaining how seismic activity off the coast of the Pacific Northwest may cause an 9.0 earthquake within the next 50 years.

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Big Picture Science – What Lies Beneath: William Sager / Tamu Massif

November 28, 2016

What Lies Beneath / Tamu Massif click to listen (TRT 11:09) Part 2 of What Lies Beneath, featuring William Sager, marine geophysicist in the department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Houston, discussing the discovery of Tamu Massif, the largest volcano in the world, located at the bottom of the Pacific just […]

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Big Picture Science – What Lies Beneath: Bruce Robison / Bounty of Bristlemouth

November 28, 2016

What Lies Beneath / Bounty of Bristlemouth click to listen (TRT 14:15) Part 1 of What Lies Beneath, featuring Bruce Robison, Deep sea biologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, discussing how bristlemouth fish of the genus cyclothone are the most numerous vertebrates on earth.

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Big Picture Science – Weather Vain

November 21, 2016

Big Picture Science – Weather Vain Everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. Not that they haven’t tried. History is replete with attempts to control the weather, but we’d settle for an accurate seven-day forecast. Find out how sophisticated technology might improve accuracy, including predicting the behavior of severe storms. […]

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Big Picture Science – Weather Vain: Alan Robock / Weather Modification

November 21, 2016

BiPiSci – Weather Modificationclick to listen (trt 13:30) Part 4 of Weather Vain, featuring Alan Robock, meteorologist and climatologist at the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers University and IPCC lead author, discussing past attempts at, and the current state of, weather modification.

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Big Picture Science – Weather Vain: Steven Miller / Bermuda Hex-clouds

November 21, 2016

BiPiSci – Bermuda Hex-cloudsclick to listen (trt 6:41) Part 3 of Weather Vain, featuring Steven Miller, meteorologist at hte Colorado State University Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, describing how the Science Channel misrepresented his analysis of hexagonal clouds over what is commonly known as “the Bermuda triangle”.

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Big Picture Science – Weather Vain: Peter Moore / Early Meteorology

November 21, 2016

BiPiSci – Early Meteorologyclick to listen (trt 8:43) Part 2 of Weather Vain, featuring Peter Moore, author of “The Weather Experiment: The Pioneers Who Sought to See the Future.”

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Big Picture Science – Weather Vain: Cliff Mass / Weather Forecasting

November 21, 2016

BiPiSci – Weather Forecastingclick to listen (trt 10:17) Part 1 of Weather Vain, featuring Cliff Mass, professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington, discussing the current state of weather forecasting.

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